Team Leader (DSP)

Dr. Michael Wolff
Dr. Michael Wolff
Phone: +49 391 67 546 76
Fax: +49 391 6110 588
Room: G25-114

Additional Information


  •  Sartorius Stedim Biotech GmbH
  •  Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe; Biomolecular Separation Engineering (Prof. Dr. Jürgen Hubbuch)
  •  IDT Biologika GmbH
  •  Tosoh Bioscience GmbH

The project is financed by the industry and the BMBF (0315640C)

Macromolecules in Bioprocess Engineering

Macromolecules In Bioprocess Engineering


Macromolecular components play an important role in bioprocesses, where they are frequently the desired end-product, e.g. virus particles, virus like particles (VLPs), phages and large compounds.
Composition as well as chemical and physical properties of biological macromolecular structures are often not fully known. However, they have a major impact on the process outcome and product characteristics. Hence, without detailed understanding of process components and their interactions efficient process design and optimizations are nearly impossible.

<p style="text-align: left;" align="center"><em>Figure 1. Virus particle size distributions after two different processes with the same starting material.</em></p> Zoom Image

Figure 1. Virus particle size distributions after two different processes with the same starting material.

Aim of the project

The primary goal of the project is to investigate size distributions and aggregation behavior of virus particles during the downstream processing (DSP) of bioreactor harvests for manufacturing of human and veterinary vaccines. Several different complementary nanoparticle measurement methods will be used for the analysis, e.g. differential centrifugation sedimentation (DCS) [1], tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS) [2], and others. Based on the results obtained, the established DSP trains will be optimized to improve yields and product characteristics.


[1] A. Neumann, W. Hoyer, M. W. Wolff, U. Reichl, A. Pfitzner, and B. Roth, ‘New method for density determination of nanoparticles using a CPS disc centrifuge™’, Colloids Surf. B Biointerfaces, vol. 104, pp. 27–31, Apr. 2013.
[2] F. Akpinar and J. Yin, ‘Characterization of vesicular stomatitis virus populations by tunable resistive pulse sensing’, J. Virol. Methods, vol. 218, pp. 71–76, Jun. 2015.

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