MaxPlanckResearch

MaxPlanckResearch contains a wide variety of articles about research going on at the institutes of the Max Planck Society.

All articles are written in an informative and easy-to-read manner and are ideal for members of the general public including school students who would like to keep informed about the latest developments in scientific research. The magazine is published quarterly.

Here you can see an overview of all published magazines:
http://www.mpg.de/mpresearch

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Contributions to MaxPlanckResearch

Issue 2007

Some chemical processes behave like good-natured monsters: they can be controlled, but they remain fairly unpredictable – and that’s why they cost the chemical industry millions. Kau Sundmacher and his team at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems are radically simplifying just such unruly processes. Sometimes they are able to do this in a single step where the industry previously needed two.

MaxPlanckResearch 3/2007
A Short Process in a Chemical Reactor

Some chemical processes behave like good-natured monsters: they can be controlled, but they remain fairly unpredictable – and that’s why they cost the chemical industry millions. Kau Sundmacher and his team at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems are radically simplifying just such unruly processes. Sometimes they are able to do this in a single step where the industry previously needed two. [more]
Navigating the Rhine on a dark and foggy night requires an experienced hand at the helm. If there is any visibility at all, distinguishing the navigation lights from the barrage of other ship and shore lights can be a formidable task. Ernst Dieter Gilles and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems in Magdeburg have developed an integrated navigation system that gives barge skippers a much clearer perspective in such situations. In fact, in the future, the system is intended to steer the vessel automatically

MaxPlanckResearch 1/2007
Computer at the Helm

Navigating the Rhine on a dark and foggy night requires an experienced hand at the helm. If there is any visibility at all, distinguishing the navigation lights from the barrage of other ship and shore lights can be a formidable task. Ernst Dieter Gilles and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems in Magdeburg have developed an integrated navigation system that gives barge skippers a much clearer perspective in such situations. In fact, in the future, the system is intended to steer the vessel automatically [more]
 
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